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Classroom Activities: How to Hold a Classroom Debate

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❶He also lists some inspiring stories of the latter instances.

GUN CONTROL PERSUASIVE ESSAY

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ARGUMENTATIVE ESSAY ON GUN CONTROL
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Critical gun control essay. A critical essay discusses the advantages and disadvantages of its subject. You can discuss the advantages and disadvantages of a certain approach to gun control. Expository essay on gun control. An expository essay sets out to describe the issue in its current state, without any evaluations. Here, you can talk about the current state of the gun control regulations. Persuasive gun control essay.

A persuasive essay is where you have to convince an opponent that you are right. For example, you can try and convince a pro gun control lobbyist that strict regulations are not the answer to a problem.

Evidently, gun control as an essay topic gives the most fertile ground for persuasive and argumentative essays. So, these are the most common kinds of essays that students have to write on gun control. Usually, an exciting argumentative essay starts with a controversial topic that suggests two or more polar opinions on it.

With gun control, it should not pose any problem. You do have to avoid any emotional language, but you still need to have your own argument on the issue. Given the controversial nature of the topic, this should also pose no problem: The next thing you do is collect evidence to support your argument. This may include collecting evidence in support of the opposing argument for you to rebuke. There is a lot of material on both sides of the argument, so even an extensive research for your gun control argumentative essay should not be too challenging.

Once you have conducted your research, it is time to start writing. Just as any other essay, an argumentative essay on gun control comprises of three parts: In the introducing paragraph, you present your topic to the reader by giving some relevant background information and stating your standpoint on the issue in your thesis statement.

The main body of your essay will consist of three parts: In the conclusion of your gun control argumentative essay, you briefly re-state your standpoint and why it is the right one. Persuasive essays are largely similar to argumentative ones, so much that it may be difficult to pinpoint the difference at first. This difference mainly lies in the ways by which you prove the rightness of your claim.

Let us take a closer look at these ways. The commonly accepted classification suggests three main methods of persuasion: Logos employs logic to appeal to the reader's rationality. Pathos uses the irrational and appeals to emotion. Ethos employs authority and appeals to the sense of ethics. As we have mentioned, an argumentative essay focuses on proving the rightness of your argument rationally - so, it employs logos as the only method of persuasion.

In a persuasive essay, on the other hand, you focus on your result - persuading your reader. Thus, you can employ whichever of the three methods of persuasion you like in any combination. When we talk specifically about gun control, it is a heavily emotional topic, so it is hard to stick to dry facts and logic exclusively.

So, when writing a gun control persuasive essay, not only logical but also ethical and emotional appeal is probably much easier than writing an argumentative essay and sticking to logic. Consequentially, an argumentative essay suggests that you use neutral language at all times, whereas in a persuasive essay you can relax and write in moderately emotional language here and there.

The writing and pre-writing processes for a persuasive essay will not be different from those for an argumentative one: As we have discussed, gun control is an extremely broad and multi-angled topic. Naturally, it is much bigger than one can cover in any essay, and you can investigate this topic in a gun control research paper or even bigger academic papers.

If you choose to write a research paper on gun control, however, you will still find that the topic is too broad and you will have to narrow it down according to your personal and academic interest.

Still, if you find a particular gun control-related topic interesting, it is not enough to make a good topic for a research paper. It also has to be original, i. On the bright side, you usually will not have to pick a fixed topic and stick to it. At the initial stage of your work, you can formulate your subject somewhat vaguely and specify and adjust the topic to your liking with the course of your research.

Another distinct feature of a research paper is that it needs a presentable list of referenced sources. You do not have to stick to other authors' writing here. You are also allowed often even encouraged to get and use your own empirical findings. One final thing that you need to know about a research paper is that it needs to focus on the research data - facts and analytics, rather than opinions and reflections - your own or those of other authors.

Provide another sheet of paper that the student can place on top of the tracing. Because the tracing was done with a dark pen, the outline should be visible on the sheet below. Direct students to use the outlines as guides and to write their words around it.

Provide students a variety of different colored pencils or markers to use as they write. Then invite students to share their work with the class. They might cut out the hand outlines and mount them on construction paper so you can display the hands for open house. Challenge each parent to identify his or her child's hand. Then provide each student with five different-colored paper strips.

Have each student write a different talent on separate paper strips, then create a mini paper chain with the strips by linking the five talents together. As students complete their mini chains, use extra strips of paper to link the mini chains together to create one long class chain.

Have students stand and hold the growing chain as you link the pieces together. Once the entire chain is constructed and linked, lead a discussion about what the chain demonstrates -- for example, all the students have talents; all the students have things they do well; together, the students have many talents; if they work together, classmates can accomplish anything; the class is stronger when students work together than when individual students work on their own.

Hang the chain in the room as a constant reminder to students of the talents they possess and the benefits of teamwork. Your school librarian might have a discard pile you can draw from. Invite students to search through the magazines for pictures, words, or anything else that might be used to describe them. Then use an overhead projector or another source of bright light to create a silhouette of each student's profile; have each student sit in front of the light source as you or another student traces the outline of the silhouette on a sheet of by inch paper taped to the wall.

Have students cut out their silhouettes, then fill them with a collage of pictures and words that express their identity. Then give each student an opportunity to share his or her silhouette with the group and talk about why he or she chose some of the elements in the collage.

Post the silhouettes to create a sense of "our homeroom. You can use such cards to gather other information too, such as school schedule, why the student signed up for the class, whether the student has a part-time job, and whether he or she has access to the Internet at home.

As a final bit of information, ask the student to write a headline that best describes him or her! This headline might be a quote, a familiar expression, or anything else. When students finish filling out the cards, give a little quiz. Then read aloud the headlines one at a time. Ask students to write the name of the person they think each headline best describes.

Who got the highest score? It seems as if parents are contacted only if there is a problem with students. At the end of each grading period, use the home address information to send a postcard to a handful of parents to inform them about how well their child is doing.

This might take a little time, but it is greatly appreciated! Pop Quiz Ahead of time, write a series of getting-to-know-you questions on slips of paper -- one question to a slip.

You can repeat some of the questions. Then fold up the slips, and tuck each slip inside a different balloon. Blow up the balloons. Give each student a balloon, and let students take turns popping their balloons and answering the questions inside. Contributor Unknown Fact or Fib? This is a good activity for determining your students' note-taking abilities. Tell students that you are going to share some information about yourself.

They'll learn about some of your background, hobbies, and interests from the second oral "biography" that you will present. Suggest that students take notes; as you speak, they should record what they think are the most important facts you share. When you finish your presentation, tell students that you are going to tell five things about yourself. Four of your statements should tell things that are true and that were part of your presentation; one of the five statements is a total fib.

This activity is most fun if some of the true facts are some of the most surprising things about you and if the "fib" sounds like something that could very well be true. Tell students they may refer to their notes to tell which statement is the fib. Next, invite each student to create a biography and a list of five statements -- four facts and one fib -- about himself or herself. Then provide each student a chance to present the second oral biography and to test the others' note-taking abilities by presenting his or her own "fact or fib quiz.

Mitzi Geffen Circular Fact or Fib? Here's a variation on the previous activity: Organize students into two groups of equal size. One group forms a circle equally spaced around the perimeter of the classroom. There will be quite a bit of space between students. The other group of students forms a circle inside the first circle; each student faces one of the students in the first group. Give the facing pairs of students two minutes to share their second oral "biographies.

After each pair completes the activity, the students on the inside circle move clockwise to face the next student in the outer circle. Students in the outer circle remain stationary throughout the activity. When all students have had an opportunity to share their biographies with one another, ask students to take turns each sharing facts and fibs with the class. The other students refer to their notes or try to recall which fact is really a fib. Contributor Unknown People Poems Have each child use the letters in his or her name to create an acrostic poem.

Tell students they must include words that tell something about themselves -- for example, something they like to do or a personality or physical trait.

Invite students to share their poems with the class. This activity is a fun one that enables you to learn how your students view themselves. Allow older students to use a dictionary or thesaurus. You might also vary the number of words for each letter, according to the students' grade levels. Bill Laubenberg Another Poetic Introduction.

Ask students to use the form below to create poems that describe them. This activity lends itself to being done at the beginning of the school year and again at the end of the year. You and your students will have fun comparing their responses and seeing how the students and the responses have changed. Contributor Unknown Food for Thought To get to know students and to help them get to know one another, have each student state his or her name and a favorite food that begins with the same first letter as the name.

Watch out -- it gets tricky for the last person who has to recite all the names and foods! Here's a challenging activity that might help high school teachers learn about students' abilities to think critically. Send students into the school hallways or schoolyard, and ask each to find something that "is completely the opposite of yourself.

To widen the area to be explored, provide this activity as homework on the first night of school. When students bring their items back to class, ask each to describe why the item is not like him or her. You'll get a lot of flowers, of course, and students will describe how those flowers are fragrant or soft or otherwise unlike themselves. But you might also get some clever responses, such as the one from a young man who brought in the flip-top from a discarded can; he talked about its decaying outward appearance and its inability to serve a purpose without being manipulated by some other force and how he was able to serve a purpose on his own.

Joy Ross Personal Boxes In this activity, each student selects a container of a reasonable size that represents some aspect of his or her personality or personal interests, such as a football helmet or a saucepan. Ask students to fill that object with other items that represent themselves -- for example, family photos, CDs, dirty socks, a ballet shoe -- and bring their containers back to school.

Students can use the objects in the containers as props for three-minute presentations about themselves. The teacher who provided this idea suggests that you model the activity and encourage creativity by going first -- it's important for students to see you as human too! Thesis statements tend to:. The primacy effect states that first impressions can create a lasting perception of a particular phenomenon.

This can be counted as a thesis statement too! An unimpressive start to an essay severely limits the chances of it being read till its conclusion.

It should provide a brief summary of what is in store for the reader without giving away too much detail so that it does not steal any attention from the main body.

Introductory paragraphs also contain thesis statements which enable the article to start off with momentum. They can act as gateways to the main argument and lead the reader on into the detailed expression that the main body possesses. This section is the core of the argumentative essay.

This is where the arguments are brought forth in detail. This section should be split up into multiple paragraphs. It is a good idea to split every argument into its own paragraph and address the strongest arguments first so as to create a strong case for the essay. Writing in the order of strength and relevance of the arguments helps reassure readers that are in agreement with the statement, and more importantly, helps to convince readers with opposing views.

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Outline Template for Position or Debate Paper I. Presentation of the Issue II. Thesis Statement - Read through this page to get you started, it explains it well -.

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An outline is a “blueprint” or “plan” for your paper. It helps you to organize your thoughts and arguments. A good outline can make conducting research and then writing the paper very efficient.

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