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What Is "Federalist No. 10" About?

by James Madison

❶But they seem not to have been apprised of the sentiments of that great man expressed in another part of his work, nor to have adverted to the consequences of the principle to which they subscribe with such ready acquiescence.

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Federalist No. 10

Plus, the state governments retain a large portion of their sovereignty under the new form of government, which is dependent on the state governments for its elections and its membership in the Senate. The state governments will always collectively overpower the central government due to the sheer number of state officials, and to the close connection of the people to their local governments.

The state and federal governments are not competing for power, but designed to effectively work together in protecting the common good. The state governments are responsible for internal affairs, and the federal for external affairs. They have the mutual authority to check the power of the other, through the power of the people. This will especially protect the state governments from usurpations of power by the federal government. The division of the federal government into three distinct branches, each with the authority to effectively check the power of the others will also ensure the best protection of individual liberty.

Although critics claim that a mixing of powers will potentially lead to all the powers amassed in one branch, the subdivision of authority on two levels, state and federal, provides a double protection for the rights of the people.

The unique characteristics of the American people make it perfect for self- government. The form of an extended republican government described by the U. Constitution will offer the best protection for the individual rights of citizens while having the power to work towards the common good. The Federalist Papers by: Brief Overview This document the Federalist will provide all the reasons to support the new plan of government described in the U.

This concludes the summary but if the reader will permit this humble summarizer I will briefly address the following issue: Is there something wrong with our constitution? Is our electorate operating unconstitutionally? Suppose tobacco farmers in North Carolina through thought or corruption or whatever gained sufficient support in their state to pass a law requiring all individuals over 13 years of age to smoke tobacco.

They then brought this desire to the Federal Republican Government. But here their interests would have minimal support from representatives from Maine, Texas, and everywhere else other than NC because the representatives from all other states considering the liberty of their constituents and the good of the rest of the country would never approve such a law at the national level.

Therefore a large Republic will defeat the will of a faction if it is detrimental to the whole because of the merit of the representatives, the founders thought. Party Unity at the Congressional level will defeat our form of representative government as it did with Obamacare. If representatives vote with the party interests over the interests of the people then a representative form of government will fail in the protection of the liberty of the people.

If our representatives, House and Senate, are of the people, meaning one of us, by the people, meaning elected by us, and for the Party instead of for the people, then our country may indeed perish from this earth. Following years of aggression with tax collectors, the region finally exploded in a confrontation that had President Daniel Ellsberg, a former Defense Department analyst who had become an antiwar activist, had stolen the documents. On March 8, , a group of Pennsylvania militiamen slaughtered some 90 unarmed Native Americans at the Moravian mission settlement of Gnadenhutten, Ohio.

Although the militiamen claimed they were seeking revenge for Indian raids on their frontier settlements, the Indians they James Madison was a founding father of the United States and the fourth American president, serving in office from to An advocate for a strong federal government, the Virginia-born Madison composed the first drafts of the U.

Constitution and the Bill of This website uses cookies for analytics, personalization, and advertising. Click here to learn more or change your cookie settings. By continuing to browse, you agree to our use of cookies. Whiskey Rebellion The Whiskey Rebellion was a uprising of farmers and distillers in western Pennsylvania in protest of a whiskey tax enacted by the federal government.

What Is Madison's Thesis in Federalist Paper Number 10?

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The Federalist Papers study guide contains a biography of Alexander Hamilton, John Jay and James Madison, literature essays, a complete e-text, quiz questions, major themes, characters, and a full summary and analysis.

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A short summary of The Founding Fathers's The Federalist Papers (). This free synopsis covers all the crucial plot points of The Federalist Papers ().

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The Federalist Summary No Madison November 22, This paper is considered an important document in American history for it lays out how the writers of the constitution defined the form of government that would protect minority rights from organized and united factions that intended to pass legislation injurious to the liberty of the minority or detrimental to the good of the country. A summary of Federalist Essays No - No in The Founding Fathers's The Federalist Papers (). Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of The Federalist Papers () and what it means. Perfect for acing essays, tests, .

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Get free homework help on The Federalist: book summary, chapter summary and analysis and original text, quotes, essays, and character analysis courtesy of CliffsNotes. First published in , The Federalist is a collection of 85 newspaper articles, written by the mysterious Publius, that argued swift ratification of the U.S. Constitution. Federalist No. 10 is an essay written by James Madison as the tenth of The Federalist Papers: a series of essays initiated by Alexander Hamilton arguing for the ratification of the United States Constitution.